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May 15, 2021 – Isaiah 42:1-4


I think I’ll go back and, one by one, take a look at Isaiah’s Servant Songs, which, almost eight hundred years before Christ, pictured Messiah and his ministry. The first is Isaiah 42:1-4. Isaiah, speaking for God, begins: “Behold, my servant” (42:1). This is God’s servant. God chooses him and upholds him by his power. The Lord puts his Spirit on him and is delighted in him. He is unassuming (“he will not cry aloud or lift up his voice”). He is caring and compassionate (“a bruised reed he will not break”). He will establish justice. And he will be successful in accomplishing all he intends (“will not grow faint or be discouraged”). And eagerly is he anticipated (“the coastlands wait for his law”).


This prophecy perfectly describes Jesus, the Messiah, and his ministry. Always, we are to behold him! Charles Spurgeon: “When all other saviors fail, look to the Savior whom God has set up. The darker all things else become, the more eagerly look for His appearing, whose coming is as a morning without clouds. When the lower lights are burning dim, behold the lamp above.” And, then, Charles Wesley:


Other refuge have I none;

hangs my helpless soul on thee;

leave, ah! leave me not alone,

still support and comfort me.

All my trust on thee is stayed,

all my help from thee I bring;

cover my defenseless head

with the shadow of thy wing.

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