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April 21, 2022 - Job 15-17

Ah, now it’s Eliphaz the Temanite’s turn to speak, and he tells Job that he is talking like a foolish man: “Should a wise man answer with windy knowledge, and fill his belly with the east wind? Should he argue in unprofitable talk, or in words with which he can do no good?” (15:2-3). Interestingly, in his tirade against Job, Eliphaz stumbles upon a truth, one which he likely does not fully grasp: “What is man, that he can be pure? Or he who is born of a woman, that he can be righteous?” (15:14) But, then, Job is not arguing that he is perfectly pure or righteous, only that he believes he has not sinned so greatly as to experience his present terrible troubles.


To his three companions, Job says, “Miserable comforters are you all. Shall windy words have an end?” (16:2-3) In other words, “You guys have been no help at all!” Job continues, “My face is red with weeping, and on my eyelids is deep darkness, although there is no violence in my hands, and my prayer is pure. . . . Even now, behold, my witness is in heaven, and he who testifies for me is on high” (16:16-19). Job’s understanding is not yet perfect. He has yet to arrive at the place he needs to be. But he is catching glimpses of the truth. He finds no consolation among his friends but there is one, a witness in heaven, who will plead his case! Can’t help but recall the words we often sing.


In Christ alone my hope is found

He is my light, my strength, my song

This cornerstone, this solid ground

Firm through the fiercest drought and storm

What heights of love, what depths of peace

When fears are stilled, when strivings cease

My comforter, my all in all

Here in the love of Christ I stand. -- Keith Getty & Stuart Townend (2001)

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