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May 18, 2021 – Isaiah 52:13-53:12


This is the fourth of Isaiah’s Servant Songs. At times, the servant appears to be Israel. From the beginning of Israel, God had intended for her to be a servant to the nations, declaring his word and making known his redemption. Remember God’s promise to Abram? “In you all the families of the earth shall be blessed” (Genesis 12:3). From the first mention of a Redeemer who is to come (Genesis 3:15), God has intended to save for himself a people from all languages and nations. How does he fulfill the promise made in Genesis 3 and 12 and in so many other places?


Not through the nation of Israel but, ultimately, through the servant, who is Messiah, will the nations be blessed. Hear what Isaiah says about him and his ministry!


Though high and lifted up, “his appearance was so marred, beyond human resemblance, and his form beyond that of the children of mankind” (52:14).


How humble is this servant: “he had no form or majesty that we should look at him, and no beauty that we should desire him” (53:2).


Despised and rejected, “he has born our griefs and carried our sorrows” (53:5). “He was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed” (53:5).


Oh, what a wonderful Savior!

Oh, what a wonderful Savior!

Oh, what a wonderful Savior

Is Jesus Christ my King! --Lewis E. Jones

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